Promise – Jilly Jarman

Reggae carol about refugees – we all belong – harmonies, guitar/piano acc. Version arranged for Beaconside school with lyrics by Jen Ellin – see Precious as a New-born baby. KEY STAGE 1, 2, 3

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Odd Socks – Joe Johnston

“It works nicely as a lullaby feel with arpeggiated chords. But equally it could work a bit faster, shuffled and more bouncy. Delaying it by a bar with a second voice indicates it could work well as a canon, with some adjustments made. I will try it out and come up with more definite suggestions.”
KEY STAGE 1 & 2

score | mp3

Muevete – J Jarman

Y vela-Castro, Warcop school Written for Vocal Union project 2006-7. Easy Spanish up-beat song – harmonies, guitar/ piano, few words KEY STAGE 1, 2, 3 & upwards

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Molto Bene Grazie

Jennifer Ellin Greetings song in italian. Can be sung as a round or with a repeated riff (ostinato). Written for Beaconside Junior School for their Vocal Union assembly KEY STAGE 1, 2, 3

mp3 | score

May The Force Be With You

new words to ‘Throw Catch’ by Skura Adapted by Mr White, Science teacher at Spring Gardens Primary School and VU leaders Sofia Castro and Claire Tustin. Mr White wanted a song to help him teach children the concept of ‘forces’, we then tied it in with the school’s international week by adding some Portuguese words.)
KEY STAGE 1, 2, 3

words | mp3

Good Morning Everybody – J Jarman

For Beaconside Schools Written for Singing Communities 2005. Greeting song which allows high and low sounds and play acting. Jazzy. KEY STAGE 1 & 2

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Dinah

Playground song from Northumberland with American music. Really popular Key stage 1 and 2

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Muevete

J Jarman, Y Vela-Castro, Warcop school. Written for Vocal Union project 2006-7. Easy Spanish up-beat song – harmonies, guitar/ piano, few words.
KEY STAGE 1, 2, 3 & upwards

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Senwa Dedende

Traditional Ghanaian song. This short and simple piece can be harmonised, sung in a round, sung over riffs, played with instruments, have new words written to it. A very popular song for teachers from KS1 upwards. 

Audio |  Score

Juba

Beth Allen says: “This is an old African American folk song that evolved from a plantation dance. It is closely linked to Hambone and is often found together in collections. Juba became a common name for African Americans who were talented at singing or dancing in the 19th century. The most famous was William Henry Lane or Master Juba, who combined African derived and European dances in his performances, including Irish jigs. He is now seen by many as the originator of tap dance.” Suitable for Key Stage 1, 2, and 3

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